Text Color



Like many other data professionals, I was drawn to numbers by sports. I am the prototypical stat-geek with baseball being my vice of choice. I was reading a post from Buster Olney about Evan Gattis' strengths as a pinch hitter. I noticed an area that a visual design best practice may have improved the post.

An item commonly stressed by data visualization guru Edward Tufte is the use of light / bold colors in the presentation of text data on a screen. The data is the most important element on the page, and should be treated as so. Tufte believes the fact text should be more pronounced than the label.

Below I have copied the data from the posts and provided an improved version.

Original Post

The legend of Oso Blanco -- the White Bear, as Gattis was called in winter ball -- is built on this kind of production as a pinch hitter:

Plate appearances: 11
At-bats: 8
Hits: 6
Walks: 3
Home Runs: 4
Doubles: 1

So he has an .818 on-base percentage as a pinch hitter. That’s .818, and yes, while that’s a small sample size, he’s impacting games and impacting decisions, even when he’s not actually hitting.

Updated

The legend of Oso Blanco -- the White Bear, as Gattis was called in winter ball -- is built on this kind of production as a pinch hitter:

Plate appearances: 11
At-bats: 8
Hits: 6
Walks: 3
Home Runs: 4
Doubles: 1

So he has an .818 on-base percentage as a pinch hitter. That's .818, and yes, while that's a small sample size, he's impacting games and impacting decisions, even when he's not actually hitting.

The second post draws your eye to the facts and the labels become less “noisy”. In this text example, the color elements have an understated impact. However, this concept can make a profound difference in data-rich applications.

TAGS: Edward Tufte, QlikView, Color, Presentation, Reporting, Visualization

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